'To the angel Kamael that guides the congregation of Scorpio, write:'

So says your boss, He who has the seven spirits of Yahweh and the seven stars:

'I know you inside and out, always have, and I love you even though you are the walking dead.

'Look around you!!  You don't even realize what has happened to you!!  You don't even see what has become of the bright, sharply sweet, incisive and altruistic person I used to know.  You were really Something then!!

'Go back and think about who you were, who you really were inside, when we first met;  look at yourself now.  You just don't see anymore and your best gift has always been perception.  You were made to be the bellwether, the watchmen, the prophets and alarms.  

'Yet now you are overcome with surprise when you occasionally find Me in your midst.  You didn't see Me come in.

'There are still a few who have not slept for a week in their street clothes, or who are still in their pajamas at 3 in the afternoon.

'Those who keep watch and see it coming will be ready, dressed in colors to match their pure hearts, whose names will be written in the stars forever, whose names will be called out loud by Me for the whole of creation to hear.

 

'Say these things to ALL the churches.'  





     Jesus Christ wrote this letter to the angel Camael, known as Mars, who presides over the congregation of Scorpio, exemplified by the church in the city of Sardis.

     The news is not good, and hardly shocking;  this church is spiritually dead.  A scant few, a remnant, have remained faithful, in an ambiance that glorifies violence, gore, and indignity.  The rare good deeds which are done are not complete in the sight of God;  this should sound a warning to us that is very real!  Unless we awaken from our worldly obsessions, we are warned that we will miss the signs of His coming, and He will come upon us like a thief in the night!

     We will walk with Jesus and be acknowledged as belonging to Him when we turn to Him, He promises.  He reminds us that Jesus Himself is the Good Shepherd, confessed by His own lips: 'I AM the Good Shepherd; the Good Shepherd lays down His life for His sheep.' John 10:11.

     Good news to all!





Scorpio

This transmutative sign is always awash in mystery, controversy, and change. The enduring qualities of Scorpio are regenerative, healing, forgiving and resurgent.


The Scorpion is widely known for not only duality, but three levels of it. The serpent is the lowest and most primitive emanation; the eagle is the average everyday Scorpio one meets at Starbucks, with the Phoenix rising through self sacrifice to become the eternal star of an immortal heavens. 


Both Dynamic Energy and Fate are at home in Scorpio, and some suggest a third body. Duality in rulership may be compared to living in a house divided against itself. 


Dynamic Energy displays how willing and skilled we as prudent Christians are in publicly confirming our stand within the Christian body by having our actions speak louder than our words.


The influence we know as Fate is currently reposing in the Far Seeing sign of Sagittarius. The public cleansing of the churches of their dirty laundry and diseased shepherds, the quiet revolution in cultural values and overhauling of legal processes, are founded by this little powerhouse visiting the Centaur. The Influence of Fate, which has occupied Sagittarius for some years past, has turned direct now, and requires an accounting from all of us. This influence causes change from within, evolving and purifying the inner person from the ground level up; change that cannot be undone or turned back, but is willed by Heaven. This can be harsh if one fights oneself, or gets in ones own way, but a serene transition to higher things if one goes along. 


The influence of Fate is both a recording angel, and is an allegory of our giving up ourselves for our new life in Christ.


The natural scent of Scorpio is patchouli, which is sometimes called graveyard dust. Most people really love this scent, it has very spiritual qualities. The metal is fine spun steel. Although the topaz, lodestone, or bloodstone are the most associated gems, a wise Christian Scorpio would seriously commend the aqua aura crystal, with it's ability to bring light into the throat for healing and expressing emotions, for increasing the awareness of inner truth, and for encouraging others to live out their spirituality. 


Scorpios material is anything recycled, or a pattern resembling snakeskin.


The foods are anything scarlet red and black, truffles, oats, and artichokes. 


These associations give the prudent Christian Scorpio a deeper insight into his nature and place in the world. 


Your words of knowledge are, 'I am taking myself to the heights!'


The Scorpio garden features chrysanthemum, orchid, violet, dogwood, eucalyptus, foxglove, raspberry, hops, rye, unicorn root, and periwinkle, with a treasure chest at the center.


The most effective pilgrimage for Scorpio or anyone with a strong influx of Dynamic Energy influence would be Notre Dame de Paris in France. A further visit to the Holocaust memorials in Germany or Poland, or at Hiroshima, would complete your destination. 


The most effective shrine would be in a low garden, vineyard, muddy stream, small pond, operating room, bathroom, a recycle station, compost heap, junk yard, crematorium or incinerating plant. Dedicate the shrine in the key of E. 




Reconciliation, A Unique Gift of Scorpio!!

 

Penance is a sacrament of the New Law instituted by Christ in which forgiveness of sins committed after baptism is granted through the priest's absolution to those who with true sorrow confess their sins and promise to satisfy for the same. It is called a "sacrament" not simply a function or ceremony, because it is an outward sign instituted by Christ to impart grace to the soul. As an outward sign it comprises the actions of the penitent in presenting himself to the priest and accusing himself of his sins, and the actions of the priest in pronouncing absolution and imposing satisfaction. This whole procedure is usually called, from one of its parts, "confession", and it is said to take place in the "tribunal of penance", because it is a judicial process in which the penitent is at once the accuser, the person accused, and the witness, while the priest pronounces judgment and sentence. The grace conferred is deliverance from the guilt of sin and, in the case of mortal sin, from its eternal punishment; hence also reconciliation with God, justification. Finally, the confession is made not in the secrecy of the penitent's heart nor to a layman as friend and advocate, nor to a representative of human authority, but to a duly ordained priest with requisite jurisdiction and with the "power of the keys", i.e., the power to forgive sins which Christ granted to His Church. 


By way of further explanation it is needful to correct certain erroneous views regarding this sacrament which not only misrepresent the actual practice of the Church but also lead to a false interpretation of theological statement and historical evidence. From what has been said it should be clear: that penance is not a mere human invention devised by the Church to secure power over consciences or to relieve the emotional strain of troubled souls; it is the ordinary means appointed by Christ for the remission of sin. Man indeed is free to obey or disobey, but once he has sinned, he must seek pardon not on conditions of his own choosing but on those which God has determined, and these for the Christian are embodied in the Sacrament of Penance. 

 


No Catholic believes that a priest simply as an individual man, however pious or learned, has power to forgive sins. This power belongs to God alone; but He can and does exercise it through the ministration of men. Since He has seen fit to exercise it by means of this sacrament, it cannot be said that the Church or the priest interferes between the soul and God; on the contrary, penance is the removal of the one obstacle that keeps the soul away from God. 


It is not true that for the Catholic the mere "telling of one's sins" suffices to obtain their forgiveness. Without sincere sorrow and purpose of amendment, confession avails nothing, the pronouncement of absolution is of no effect, and the guilt of the sinner is greater than before. 
While this sacrament as a dispensation of Divine mercy facilitates the pardoning of sin, it by no means renders sin less hateful or its consequences less dreadful to the Christian mind; much less does it imply permission to commit sin in the future. In paying ordinary debts, as e.g., by monthly settlements, the intention of contracting new debts with the same creditor is perfectly legitimate; a similar intention on the part of him who confesses his sins would not only be wrong in itself but would nullify the sacrament and prevent the forgiveness of sins then and there confessed. 


Strangely enough, the opposite charge is often heard, viz., that the confession of sin is intolerable and hard and therefore alien to the spirit of Christianity and the loving kindness of its Founder. But this view, in the first place, overlooks the fact that Christ, though merciful, is also just and exacting. Furthermore, however painful or humiliating confession may be, it is but a light penalty for the violation of God's law. Finally, those who are in earnest about their salvation count no hardship too great whereby they can win back God's friendship. 


Both these accusations, of too great leniency and too great severity, proceed as a rule from those who have no experience with the sacrament and only the vaguest ideas of what the Church teaches or of the power to forgive sins which the Church received from Christ. 
 

 

The Council of Trent (1551) declares: 

Power to forgive sins:
It is noteworthy that the fundamental objection so often urged against the Sacrament of Penance was first thought of by the Scribes when Christ said to the sick man of the palsy: "Thy sins are forgiven thee." "And there were some of the scribes sitting there, and thinking in their hearts: Why doth this man speak thus? he blasphemeth. Who can forgive sins but God only?" But Jesus seeing their thoughts, said to them: "Which is easier to say to the sick of the palsy: Thy sins are forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, take up thy bed and walk? But that you may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (he saith to the sick of the palsy,) I say to thee: Arise, take up thy bed, and go into thy house" (Mark 2:5-11; Matthew 9:2-7). Christ wrought a miracle to show that He had power to forgive sins and that this power could be exerted not only in heaven but also on earth. This power, moreover, He transmitted to Peter and the other Apostles. To Peter He says: "And I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven. And whatsoever thou shalt bind upon earth, it shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven" (Matthew 16:19). Later He says to all the Apostles: "Amen I say to you, whatsoever you shall bind upon earth, shall be bound also in heaven; and whatsoever you shall loose upon earth, shall be loosed also in heaven" (Matthew 18:18). As to the meaning of these texts, it should be noted: 
*that the "binding" and "loosing" refers not to physical but to spiritual or moral bonds among which sin is certainly included; the more so because 
*the power here granted is unlimited -- "whatsoever you shall bind, . . . whatsoever you shall loose"; 
*the power is judicial, i.e., the Apostles are authorized to bind and to loose; 
whether they bind or loose, their action is ratified in heaven. In healing the palsied man Christ declared that "the Son of man has power on earth to forgive sins"; here He promises that what these men, the Apostles, bind or loose on earth, God in heaven will likewise bind or loose. (Cf. also POWER OF THE KEYS.) 

 

But as the Council of Trent declares, Christ principally instituted the Sacrament of Penance after His Resurrection, a miracle greater than that of healing the sick. "As the Father hath sent me, I also send you. When he had said this, he breathed on them; and he said to them: Receive ye the Holy Ghost. Whose sins you shall forgive, they are forgiven them; and whose sins you shall retain, they are retained' (John 20:21-23). While the sense of these words is quite obvious, the following points are to be considered: 
Christ here reiterates in the plainest terms -- "sins", "forgive", "retain" -- what He had previously stated in figurative language, "bind" and "loose", so that this text specifies and distinctly applies to sin the power of loosing and binding. 

*He prefaces this grant of power by declaring that the mission of the Apostles is similar to that which He had received from the Father and which *He had fulfilled: "As the Father hath sent me". Now it is beyond doubt that He came into the world to destroy sin and that on various occasions *He explicitly forgave sin (Matthew 9:2-8; Luke 5:20; 7:47; Revelation 1:5), hence the forgiving of sin is to be included in the mission of the Apostles. 

 

Christ not only declared that sins were forgiven, but really and actually forgave them; hence, the Apostles are empowered not merely to announce to the sinner that his sins are forgiven but to grant him forgiveness-"whose sins you shall forgive". If their power were limited to the declaration "God pardons you", they would need a special revelation in each case to make the declaration valid. 
 

The power is twofold -- to forgive or to retain, i.e., the Apostles are not told to grant or withhold forgiveness nondiscriminately; they must act judicially, forgiving or retaining according as the sinner deserves. 
 

The exercise of this power in either form (forgiving or retaining) is not restricted: no distinction is made or even suggested between one kind of sin and another, or between one class of sinners and all the rest: Christ simply says "whose sins". 
 

The sentence pronounced by the Apostles (remission or retention) is also God's sentence -- "they are forgiven . . . they are retained". 
 

It is therefore clear from the words of Christ that the Apostles had power to forgive sins. But this was not a personal prerogative that was to erase at their death; it was granted to them in their official capacity and hence as a permanent institution in the Church -- no less permanent than the mission to teach and baptize all nations. Christ foresaw that even those who received faith and baptism, whether during the lifetime of the Apostles or later, would fall into sin and therefore would need forgiveness in order to be saved. He must, then, have intended that the power to forgive should be transmitted from the Apostles to their successors and be used as long as there would be sinners in the Church, and that means to the end of time. It is true that in baptism also sins are forgiven, but this does not warrant the view that the power to forgive is simply the power to baptize. In the first place, as appears from the texts cited above, the power to forgive is also the power to retain; its exercise involves a judicial action. But no such action is implied in the commission to baptize (Matthew 28:18-20); in fact, as the Council of Trent affirms, the Church does not pass judgment on those who are not yet members of the Church, and membership is obtained through baptism. Furthermore, baptism, because it is a new birth, cannot be repeated, whereas the power to forgive sins (penance) is to be used as often as the sinner may need it. Hence the condemnation, by the same Council, of any one "who, confounding the sacraments, should say that baptism itself is the Sacrament of Penance, as though these two sacraments were not distinct and as though penance were not rightly called the second plank after shipwreck" (Sess. XIV, can. 2 de sac. poen.). 
 

These pronouncements were directed against the Protestant teaching which held that penance was merely a sort of repeated baptism; and as baptism effected no real forgiveness of sin but only an external covering over of sin through faith alone, the same, it was alleged, must be the case with penance. This, then, as a sacrament is superfluous; absolution is only a declaration that sin is forgiven through faith, and satisfaction is needless because Christ has satisfied once for all men. This was the first sweeping and radical denial of the Sacrament of Penance. Some of the earlier sects had claimed that only priests in the state of grace could validly absolve, but they had not denied the existence of the power to forgive. During all the preceding centuries, Catholic belief in this power had been so clear and strong that in order to set it aside Protestantism was obliged to strike at the very constitution of the Church and reject the whole content of Tradition. 
""The Lord's words: 'Receive ye the Holy Ghost, whose sins you shall forgive, they are forgiven them, and whose sins you shall retain they are retained' (John xx, 22-23

 

The reconciliation of the sinner with God has as a further consequence the revival of those merits which he had obtained before committing grievous sin. Good works performed in the state of grace deserve a reward from God, but this is forfeited by mortal sin, so that if the sinner should die unforgiven his good deeds avail him nothing. So long as he remains in sin, he is incapable of meriting: even works which are good in themselves are, in his case, worthless: they cannot revive, because they never were alive. But once his sin is cancelled by penance, he regains not only the state of grace but also the entire store of merit which had, before his sin, been placed to his credit. On this point theologians are practically unanimous: the only hindrance to obtaining reward is sin, and when this is removed, the former title, so to speak, is revalidated. On the other hand, if there were no such revalidation, the loss of merit once acquired would be equivalent to an eternal punishment, which is incompatible with the forgiveness effected by penance. As to the further question regarding the manner and extent of the revival of merit, various opinions have been proposed; but that which is generally accepted holds with Francisco Suárez (De reviviscentia meritorum) that the revival is complete, i.e., the forgiven penitent has to his credit as much merit as though he had never sinned. See De Augustinis, "De re sacramentaria", II, Rome, 1887; Pesch, op. cit., VII; Göttler, "Der hl. Thomas v. Aquin u. die vortridentinischen Thomisten über die Wirkungen d. Bussakramentes", Freiburg, 1904. 

For those who sought to escape the obligation of confession it was natural enough to assert that repentance was the affair of the soul alone with its Maker, and that no intermediary was needed. It is this pretext that St. Augustine sweeps aside in one of his sermons: "Let no one say I do penance secretly; I perform it in the sight of God, and He who is to pardon me knows that in my heart I repent". Whereupon St. Augustine asks: "Was it then said to no purpose, 'What you shall loose upon earth shall be loosed in heaven?' Was it for nothing that the keys were given to the Church?" (Sermo cccxcii, n. 3, in P.L., XXXIX, 1711). The Fathers, of course, do not deny that sin must be confessed to God; at times, indeed, in exhorting the faithful to confess, they make no mention of the priest; but such passages must be taken in connection with the general teaching of the Fathers and with the traditional belief of the Church. Their real meaning is expressed, e.g., by Anastasius Sinaita (seventh century): "Confess your sins to Christ through the priest" (De sacra synaxi), and by Egbert, Archbishop of York (d. 766): "Let the sinner confess his evil deeds to God, that the priest may know what penance to impose" (Mansi, Coll. Conc., XII, 232). For the passages in St. John Chrysostom, see Hurter, "Theol. dogmat.", III, 454; Pesch, "Praelectiones", VII, 165. 








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